26.7.10

Feng Shui Part Five - Lucky Objects

Article

Lucky objects are symbols of good fortune, good health and positive aspirations. Every culture has its own traditions, which are sometimes shared with other cultures, but what sets the Chinese apart is knowing where to place lucky objects to benefit most from their good vibrations.

There are many lucky objects that can be used to attract positive Chi energy and deflect negative Chi energy. Following are some of the most well known and widely used in Feng Shui.

DRAGON
The dragon is regarded as the most auspicious symbol of good fortune. It signifies the power of authority. Place it so that it does not look like it is heading towards a door or window.
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PHOENIX
The phoenix is a symbol of renewal. It brings opportunities, fame and recognition. Place it so that it is not flying towards a door.
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TURTLE
A turtle symbolizes longevity and constancy but as they are slow moving creatures they are not considered suitable for a work environment.
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TIGER
A tiger represents bravery and strength. It is best placed in a den or an office. It should not look like it is ready to pounce or have its mouth open.
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HORSE
The horse symbolizes power and movement. It is often used by people who would like to travel. It should not look like it is heading for a door or window.
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ELEPHANT
Elephants should always have their trunks turned upward, as if trumpeting, to herald good news. They can be placed in the entrance hall, but not directly facing the door.
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FORTUNE FROG
The frog (actually a three-legged toad) holds a coin in its mouth and has strings of coins around its feet. It should be placed facing the door to catch the money of passers-by or near a cash register.
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LAUGHING BUDDHA
This is a symbol of prosperity and joy. He is usually prominently placed in the living room, dining room or family hall.
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AQUARIUM
An aquarium is considered lucky and can bring prosperity into the house. Place your aquarium in areas of your house or room that require activity. Fish can also absorb negative Chi, particularly the blackmoor variety, which are very sensitive.

© Copyright Jan Reid-Lennox. All Rights Reserved.